I Found Some New Leads

This past weekend I recieved two emails inquiring about the Gibson/Gipson side of the family! both are through marriage that we have a common bond.

It is so much fun  and very rewarding to connect with people and working the linage until you find the connections. Although sometimes it may just end up the relation is only  through marriage, still I consider the new additions as Cousins Discovered!!!  

 Take for instance My association with Monique Crippen-Hopkins, we started out as just members of the same Facebook online group Our Black Ancestry.  Through that group with the help of  my cousin Shelley Murphy’s introduction ,we found that the three of us were looking for family in the same small town of Charles Town West Virginia.  Charles Town, West VirgininaAs  a result  we not only found one connection but four (4) different connections through the years:

Henrietta Richardson (1897) who married George Hatter Cross (1880)

The son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter)(1850) who married in 1871 William Cross (1845)

Margaret C. Thompson (1894) who in 1931 married Eugene Godfrey Cross (1898)

Also the son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross.

Fannie C. Thompson (1892) who in 1933 married Chester Reed Cross (1892)

Also the son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross

Gelettia Sturgis Richardson married John Rufus Cross

Also son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross.

William A. Thompson (1882) who married Rebecca Farrell (1880)

The daughter of Franklin & Rebecca Hatter; Emily (Hatter) (1848) married (1871) Lorenza Farrell (1836)

Emily is sister to Sarah).

  • Monique claims the Thompson’s, Farrell’s  and the Richardson’s 
  • I claim the Hatter’s and the Cross’s 

This was Great!!

Who are my cousins?

The following article was recently noted in Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. 

A term often found in genealogy is “removed,” specifically when referring to family relationships. Indeed, almost everyone has heard of a “second cousin once removed,” but many people cannot explain that relationship. Of course, a person might be more than once removed, as in third cousin, four times removed.

In short, the definition of cousins is two people who share a common ancestor. Here are a few definitions of cousin relationships:

First Cousin: Your first cousins are the people in your family who have at least one of the same grandparents as you. In other words, they are the children of your aunts and uncles.

Second Cousin: Your second cousins are the people in your family who share the same great-grandparent with you.

Third, Fourth, and Fifth Cousins: Your third cousins share at least one great-great-grandparent, fourth cousins share a great-great-great-grandparent, and so on.

Removed: When the word “removed” is used to describe a relationship, it indicates that the two people are from different generations. “Once removed” indicates a difference of one generation, “twice removed” indicates a difference of two generations, and so forth.

For example, the child of your first cousin is your first cousin, once removed. That is, your cousin’s child would be “almost” your first cousin, except that he or she is one generation removed from that relationship. Likewise, the grandchild of your first cousin is your first cousin, twice removed (two generations removed from being a first cousin).

Many people confuse the term “first cousin, once removed” with “second cousin.” The two are not the same.

Keep in mind that you and a relative only need to share one grandparent to be first cousins, or share one great-grandparent to be second cousins, etc. If the ancestor in question had more than one spouse and the two of you are descended from different spouses, you are full cousins. There is no such thing as a “half cousin” although you will hear people use that term occasionally.

The following consanguinity chart may help to explain the relationships:

Cousins Table: A cousin is someone who shares a common ancestor with you. Use this chart to determine your relationship.

Find your     ancestor here →


Find your cousin’s ancestor here ↓

Grand-

parents

G-

Grand-

parents

GG-

Grand-

parents

GGG-

Grand-

parents

GGGG-

Grand-

parents

Grand-

parents

1st cousins 1st cousins

1x removed

1st cousins

2x removed

1st cousins

3x removed

1st cousins

4x removed

G-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

1x removed

2nd cousins 2nd cousins

1x removed

2nd cousins

2x removed

2nd cousins

3x removed

GG-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

2x removed

2nd cousins

1x removed

3rd cousins 3rd cousins

1x removed

3rd cousins

2x removed

GGG-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

3x removed

2nd cousins

2x removed

3rd cousins

1x removed

4th cousins 4th cousins

1x removed

GGGG-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

4x removed

2nd cousins

3x removed

3rd cousins

2x removed

4th cousins

1x removed

5th cousins

In the above chart, go across the top to find your ancestor: great-grandfather.
Next, go down the left column to find your cousin’s relationship to the same person: great-great-grandfather.

Now notice where the two intersect in the above chart: you and your new cousin are actually second cousins, once removed.

You may prefer to use an automated online tool to determine relationships. Ancestor Search has one that we found simple to use. Take a look athttp://www.searchforancestors.com/utility/cousincalculator.html

Here are a few other terms you may encounter when determining relationships:

HALF – Means you share only one parent. Example: half-brothers may have the same father but different mothers, etc.

STEP – Not blood kin, but a close legal relationship due to re-marriage of a parent, such as step-mother, step-brother, step-son, etc.

DOUBLE FIRST COUSINS – Are first cousins twice, once on your father’s side and once on your mother’s side, since your father’s sibling married your mother’s sibling.

IN-LAW – They are not really blood kin but are treated as such because they married blood kin.

Example: Your mother-in-law is not really your mother but is treated as such because you married her daughter/son. In law, you and your spouse are considered “one”. Also your brother-in-law is your brother because your parents are also his parents, in “law” (mother-in-law, father-in-law, etc.).

KITH and KIN – “Kith” are friends and acquaintances whereas “Kin” are blood relatives or someone treated as such, in law.

By the way, it is estimated that everyone has approximately 4 trillion 20th cousins! In other words, everyone is related to nearly everyone else.

By Julie Collins on Categories: Genealogy

Getting back on track

Now that the New Year is here and the holidays distractions are behind us,  it’s time to get back on tract!

During the course of my researching various family members  I have run across  the terms Mulatto, White and Black all in the same census of one family.  So I stopped and took a bit of a turn to research the words and why they might be used in this context.

  • The term “black” is often used in the West to describe people whose skin is darker. In the United States, it is particularly used to describe African-Americans. The terms for African-Americans have changed over the years, as shown by the categories in the United States Census, taken every ten years.
  • In the first U.S. Census, taken in 1790, just four categories were used: Free White males, Free White females, other free persons, and slaves.
  • In the 1820 census the new category “colored” was added.
  • In the 1850 census, slaves were listed by owner, and a B indicated black, while an M indicated “mulatto.”
  • In the 1890 census, the categories for race were white, black, mulatto, quadroon (a person one-quarter black); octoroon (a person one-eighth black), Chinese, Japanese, or American Indian.
  • In the 1930 census, anyone with any black blood was supposed to be listed as “Negro.”
  • In the 1970 census, the category “Negro or black” was used for the first time.
  • In the 2000 and 2012 census, the category “Black or African-American” was used, defined as “a person having their origin in any of the racial groups in Africa.” In the 2012 Census 12.1 percent of Americans identified themselves as Black or African-American.*

“Through the Decades”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-01-01

HMMMMMM

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