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Charles Town Researchers

We’re getting together again!

“What We Found When We Came Together.”  

Come Join Us:

10 AM – 3 PM,

Saturday, April 13, 2019.

Location: Fishermen’s Hall

 Located at the northeast corner of South West and Academy Streets in Charles Town, WV

Sponsors:

Friends of Happy Retreat, Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society, Jefferson County Historical Society, and Jefferson County Museum

We are six women with roots in

Jefferson County, WV who embarked on separate journeys into the world of our ancestors, leading us to each other and bringing us a fresh understanding of the community in which they lived. By discovering the intertwining roots of our families, under walls of division and lost history, treasured new relationships have blossomed.

Please join us at Fishermans Hall on April 13th for a presentation of our individual and shared research. In each family story, there are brush strokes still needed to complete a full picture of our past. This will continue to enrich the vast scope of our shared history, difficult and inspiring, separate and together.

So bring your questions and bring a friend!

Panel discussion and audience Q&A

Our Panelists are:

Joyceann Gray

“Yes We Remember”- her family research in Honoring and keeping alive the memories of families that have paved the way for future generations. Also, how she connected with Monique and the Harewood plantation. Her books of family history.

Monique Crippen-Hopkins

Her research on her Charles Town ancestors, including the Thompson family, who were enslaved at Claymont. Her book on the Thompsons.

Sarah Brown

“Claymont’s Families: Research on the Enslaved Population of the Claymont (Court) Plantation.” Sarah is a descendant of Claymont’s slaveholders, the Bushrod Corbin Washington family.

Shelley Murphy

“Crossing the CountyLines.” A noted genealogist traces her family from Loudoun County VA to Jefferson County as freed people.

Dr. Marsha Smith

Marsha has been researching her family’s history for over 20 years. Her maternal line has extensive connections to Jefferson and Berkeley County, West Virginia dating back to when both were part of Virginia. In recent years, she has incorporated using autosomal DNA to extend her family tree and connect to new cousins.

Nikki Landerkin

Nikki is a life long resident of Martinsburg, WV. When she’s not researching, she busy teaching 7th and 8th grade English. Nikki has only been researching for a few years, but it has become a passion for her. Her goal is to become proficient at using DNA to pinpoint the location and names of her ancestors.

Fishermans Hall

April 13, 201910am-3pm

Charles Town, WV

Another Milestone

This time at the Jefferson County museum in Charles Town.

Website Narratives of Four Descendants of Jefferson County Enslaved and Free African-Americans On the iPad to the left, you can access genealogical research and family stories by several descendants of enslaved and free black Jefferson Countians.

Monique

Monique Crippen-Hopkins, a certified paralegal, blogger, family historian, and genealogist, is a descendant of the Thompson family of Jefferson County. Influenced as a young person by the importance her mother placed on genealogy and later in life by the loss of relatives who had been the repositories of family history, she began researching her family’s origins in 2006 and in 2013. Ms. Crippen-Hopkins’s blogging has led to exciting journeys and discoveries. She is writing a book on her family’s history.

Joyceann

Joyceann Gray, a U.S. Army retiree, author,family historian, and genealogist, is a descendant of the Hatter and McCord families of Jefferson County. Her historical and genealogical research is primarily focused on her family’s movements from Virginia to Liberia, Canada, Kentucky, and several other states. Mrs. Gray’s novel, Yes We Remember, is based on historical records and family stories of her ancestors. She is a contributor to the online encyclopedia Blackpast.org/contributor/gray-joyceann and has presented her research in several venues in the mid-Atlantic states.

Shelley

Dr. Shelley Murphy, a coordinator and faculty member for the Midwest African-American Genealogy Institute, is a descendant of the Goins family of Jefferson County. She has been an avid genealogist for 30+ years, researching the Marsh, Yates, Goins, Johnson, Sims, Myers, Roper, and other families in Jefferson and Loudoun counties. She attends and presents at local and national genealogical conferences and has 20+ publications with the Charlottesville Genealogy Examiner, familytreegirl.com blog, and the Central Virginia Heritage. Jim Taylor,

Dr. Shelley Murphy, a coordinator and faculty member for the Midwest African-American Genealogy Institute, is a descendant of the Goins family of Jefferson County. She has been an avid genealogist for 30+ years, researching the Marsh, Yates, Goins, Johnson, Sims, Myers, Roper, and other families in Jefferson and Loudoun counties. She attends and presents at local and national genealogical conferences and has 20+ publications with the Charlottesville Genealogy Examiner, familytreegirl.com blog, and the Central Virginia Heritage. Jim Taylor,

Jim Taylor

Jim Taylor, life-long county resident and former high school teacher and coach, is a descendant of the Payne and Dotson families of Jefferson County. He is one of four founders and currently an officer of the Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society (JCBHPS), has written a number of books on African-American history in Jefferson County, and is a member of the board of directors of the Jefferson County Historical Society. See the JCBHPS website at http://www.jcblackhistory.org.

 

Yes We Remember Our Ancestors -This coming Friday

This coming Friday Octobert 16, 2015,  

I’ll share the story of the “Hatters” during the

AAHGS Conference

Meanwhile here’s a preview of my new book:

A funny thing happened along this journey of mine

Is it fate or is it destiny or maybe a coincidence. Better yet, could it be our Ancestors have led us back to where our roots began to grow in this country?

Please read and make up your own mind!!

My research has taken me first to Liberia, Canada, then back to Charles Town West Virginia.   I have uncovered the following information that draws me back to St. Philips in Brooklyn NY:

  • Franklin D. Hatter enslaved by Andrew H. Hunter (prosecutor of the John Brown Trial) somehow convinced A. Hunter to sponsor his four (4) children in Mt. Zion Episcopal Church for baptism. This took place in 1855.
  • After the Civil War, the white congregation of Mt. Zion donated enough money to have the colored erect their own Church. St. Philips Episcopal Church, Charles Town WV (first Sunday school was taught by Bushrod Washington (nephew of George Washington)

Which is still an active church to this day.

  • Franklin Hatter’s father was James Hatter (his enslaver not known for sure) his brother Ruben Hatter was enslaved by Samuel Walter Washington (Brother of George Washington)
  • James Hatter’s Mother Charlotte, Aunt Sarah and grandfather Frances (b.1735) were enslaved by John Ariss the architect for “Harewood Plantation” in Charles Town, WV  he freed them in his will (1802) with the condition that they stay in serve to his wife until she dies… but not the children (two for sure; James and Ruben).
  • Harewood Plantation is the original home of Colonel Samuel Walter Washington erected in 1773.
  • His descendant S.Walter Washington added on modern living quarters and continues to live there presently.
  • The Hatter name first arrived in Loudoun County, VA in 1702. England King William in an effort to repay his friends (Huguenots) who had supported his war efforts paid for their passage to the Virginia colonies.

How ironic

  1.  I now live in the same county (Loudoun) as the first known ancestor arrived.
  2.  I now live 45 minutes from Charles Town where my ancestor lived and worked.
  3. They went to church at Mt Zion and St. Philips; Methodist-Episcopal churches.
  4.  So many years later I was raised in St. Philips (Episcopal) Church in Brooklyn, baptized and confirmed.

My Research Library to date

Black History Books on my shelf

 

African American Topeka – Sherri Camp

African Canadians in Union Blue – Richard M. Reid

Annie’s Trip to Grandma’s – Barbara Rose Page

A North-side View of Slavery The Refugee – Benjamin Drew

Baby Steps to Freedom – Joyce Middleton

Black Women of the Old West – William L. Katz

Crossing the Border – Sharon A. Roger Hepburn

Exodusters – Nell Irvin Painter

From Midnight to Dawn – Jacqueline L. Tobin

Images of America African American Topeka- Sherrita Camp

Incidents of the life of a slave girl – Harriet Jacobs

In Motion- the African-American Migration Experience – Howard Dodson & Sylviane A. Dioue

Kindred – Octavia E. Butler

Lay Down Body Roberta Hughes Wright & Wilbur B. Hughes III

Legacy to Buxton – Second Edition A. C. Robbins

Lena Horne – Leslie Palmer

Lina Derritt, Petitioner, v. State Board of Real Estate Examiners Record and Pleadings – John Pegg, /William B. Saxbe

Look to the North Star – Victor Ullman

Magazine of the Jefferson County Historical Society – 12/2011

Orange Morgan’s 38,325 Mornings – Forrest M. Stith

Refugees from Slavery – Benjamin Drew

Rumors of the Truth – Lyn Spencer DeNaeyer Messersmith

Selected Writings and Speeches of – Marcus Garvey

Sketches of Ancient History of the six Nations – David Cusick

Slave Testimony – John W. Blassingame

Sunrises and Sunsets for Freedom – Forrest M. Stith

The Ancient black Hebrews and Arabs – Anu M’Bantu & Gert Muller

The Blacks in Canada A History – Robin W. Winks

The Booker T. Washington Collection – Booker T. Washington

The Family Tree Historical Maps Book – Allison Dolan

The Faces of my people – Monique Crippen

The Freedom-Seekers – Daniel G. Hill

The Philosophy of Negro Suffrage – Jerome R. Riley

The Houses in Buxton – Patricia L. Neely

The Last American Highway – Stew Magnuson

The souls of Black Folk – W.E.B DuBois

They came before Columbus – Ivan Van Sertima

Up from Slavery – Booker T. Washington

When I was a slave – Norman R. Yetman

Women’s Slave Narratives – Annie L. Burton and others

My finished Contributions Please Enjoy!!

My contributions to    http://www.blackpast.org/

Allen-bernadette-mary-1955

Brown, Gayleatha Beatrice (1947-2013)

Hatter, Hamilton (1856-1942)

Holloway, Anne Forrester (1941- 2006)

Leslie M. Alexander (1948- )

Riley, Jerome R. (1840-1929)

Stanfield, Sylvia Gaye (1943- )

Watson, Barbara Mae (1918-1983)

See more at: http://www.blackpast.org

I Found Some New Leads

This past weekend I recieved two emails inquiring about the Gibson/Gipson side of the family! both are through marriage that we have a common bond.

It is so much fun  and very rewarding to connect with people and working the linage until you find the connections. Although sometimes it may just end up the relation is only  through marriage, still I consider the new additions as Cousins Discovered!!!  

 Take for instance My association with Monique Crippen-Hopkins, we started out as just members of the same Facebook online group Our Black Ancestry.  Through that group with the help of  my cousin Shelley Murphy’s introduction ,we found that the three of us were looking for family in the same small town of Charles Town West Virginia.  Charles Town, West VirgininaAs  a result  we not only found one connection but four (4) different connections through the years:

Henrietta Richardson (1897) who married George Hatter Cross (1880)

The son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter)(1850) who married in 1871 William Cross (1845)

Margaret C. Thompson (1894) who in 1931 married Eugene Godfrey Cross (1898)

Also the son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross.

Fannie C. Thompson (1892) who in 1933 married Chester Reed Cross (1892)

Also the son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross

Gelettia Sturgis Richardson married John Rufus Cross

Also son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross.

William A. Thompson (1882) who married Rebecca Farrell (1880)

The daughter of Franklin & Rebecca Hatter; Emily (Hatter) (1848) married (1871) Lorenza Farrell (1836)

Emily is sister to Sarah).

  • Monique claims the Thompson’s, Farrell’s  and the Richardson’s 
  • I claim the Hatter’s and the Cross’s 

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