My never ending Bibliography

Bibliography for researching

Joyceann Gray – msladyjae@gmail.com

  1. Ailes, J., & Tyler-McGraw, M. (2011, December 1). “Leaving Virginia for and Marie Tyler-McGraw. “Jefferson County to Liberia: Emigrants, Emancipators, and Facilitators.” Jefferson County Historical Society, 43-76.
  2. Library of Congress..
  3. Antebellum Period. (n.d.). History Net: Where History Comes Alive. Retrieved July 27, 2014, from http://www.historynet.com/antebellum-period
  4. Burton, A. L., Delaney, L. A., & Drumgoold, K. (2006). Women’s slave narratives. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications.
  5. Caldwell, A. B., ed. History of the American Negro vol. 7: West Virginia Edition. Atlanta: A. B. Caldwell Pub. Co., 1923.
  6. Drew, B. (2004). Refugees from slavery: autobiographies of fugitive slaves in Canada. Mineola, N.Y.: Dover Publications.
  7. HAMILTON HATTER. (n.d.). HAMILTON HATTER. Retrieved July 30, 2014, from http://www.wvculture.org/history/histamne/hatter.html
  8. Jacobs, H. A., Child, L. M., & Yellin, J. F. (1987). Incidents in the life of a slave girl: written by herself. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
  9. Meraji, S., & Dem, G. (n.d.). The Whitest Historically Black College In America. NPR. Retrieved July 30, 2014, from http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/10/18/236345546/the-whitest-historically-black-college-in-america
  10. Robbins, A. C., & Robbins, J. L. (1983). Legacy to Buxton. North Buxton, Ont., Canada: A.C. Robbins. (Original work published 1983)
  11. Stith, F. M. (1973). Sunrises and sunsets for freedom. New York: Vantage Press.
  12. The Year in Review: 1863. (n.d.). Daily Report. Retrieved August 10, 2014, from http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/39639
  13. Tobin, J., & Jones, H. (2007). From Midnight to Dawn: the last tracks of the Underground Railroad. New York: Doubleday.
  14. Johnson, Mary “Hamilton Hatter.” e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia. 30 November 2012. Web. 08 November 2014.
  15. History of the American Negro and his institutions / edited by A. B. Caldwell. – Original ed. – Atlanta, Ga. : A. B. Caldwell Pub. Co., 1917. – 7 v. : ill. E185.96 C14 Contents: Vols. 1-2. Georgia ed. – v. 3. South Carolina ed. ­v. 4. North Carolina ed. – v. 5. Virginia ed. – v. 6. Washington, D.C. ed. – v. 7. West Virginia ed.
  16. Year: 1870; Census Place: Grant, Jefferson, West Virginia; Roll: M593_1689; Page: 524A; Image: 473; Family History Library Film: 553188
  17. Year: 1880; Census Place: Dan River, Pittsylvania, Virginia; Roll: 1384; Family History Film: 1255384; Page:163D; Enumeration District: 168
  18. Ancestry.com. West Virginia, Marriages Index, 1785-1971 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
  19. Year: 1881; Census Place: Raleigh, Kent, Ontario; Roll: C_13278; Page: 35; Family No: 163
  20. GenealogyBank.com  American Antiquarian Society. 2004.
  21. Year: 1900; Census Place: Overton, Dawson, Nebraska; Roll: 922; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 0093; FHL microfilm: 1240922
  22. Census – US Federal 1860 at Fold3
  23. Ancestry.com. West Virginia, Compiled Census Index, 1860-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.
  24. USGenWeb Archives – census wills deeds genealogy. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://files.usgwarchives.net/wv/history/schools/colored.txt
  25. WEB Document Inquiry. (n.d.). Retrieved February 16, 2015, from http://documents.jeffersoncountywv.org/
  26. WVGES Geology: History of West Virginia Salt Industry. (2014, July 19). Retrieved February 12, 2015, from http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/geology/geoldvsa.htm

Published by MsLadyJae

Joyceann Gray Retired US Army, Author of " Yes We Remember" and "Our DeWitty and Now We Speak" Independent Family Historian and Genealogist has a combined 40 years of service in the areas of communications, Real Estate Appraisal, and marketing. Her focus of combined colligates studies in Communications, Business Management, with a Masters in Psychology. Gray's historical and genealogical research is on her family movements from Virginia to Canada and Liberia. From Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Kansas to Nebraska and from Canada to Nebraska. All during the 18th through the 20th centuries. Her goal is to bring alive the stories of achievements and legacies that her ancestors left for present and future generations. She is an on going contributor to www.blackpast.org. and also a founding member of the Charles Town Researchers. Her personal quote is “You cannot know where you are going until you know who you are, you cannot know who you are until you know who came before… It is only then you will find your Direction and Reason for being.” J. Gray Love of God Family and life! Married to my best friend, I enjoy traveling, researching our families histories and who they were as individuals, also I enjoy cooking and making my family happy.

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