Monthly Archives: January 2015

I’ve been a Busy Bee

I updated Dr. Jerome R. Riley’s story after some more research. So please go check him out again!  https://jgraydiscovery.com/dr-jerome-r-riley/

Additionally, I completed 5 biographies  of Black Ambassadors for BlackPast.org:

Two additional  biographies yet to be posted… stay tuned..
Something new to chat about is the Facebook page  developed concerning the erection of a historical marker possibly on Route 83  to speak to the families that once homestead the lands west of Route 83 spread out along the banks of the North Loop River in DeWitty Township, later known as Audacious. This was the largest and longest lasting African-American settlement in rural Nebraska. 
We, Catherine Meehan-Blount, Marcia Thompkins and yours truly decided to support the efforts of Stew Magnuson who is proposing the erection of  marker to the powers that be! So we set the Facebook page “descendants of DeWitty” and invited family and friends to come help us support this worthy cause!
Stew Magnuson is busy these days he has two big forks in the fire: First a   release date for The Last American Highway: A Journey Through Time Down U.S. Route 83: Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma edition. February 9! and second;
he plans to announce on Kansas Statehood Day that his first confirmed booking of his multi-media presentation about The Last American Highway: A Journey Through Time Down U.S. Route 83: Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma edition will be Monday, April 13 at 6 p.m. at the Buffalo Bill Cultural Center in Oakley, Kansas! (where you find this bigger than life statue of Cody)  Bufflalo hunting

Finding family is really a wonderful thing

Well folks it has been a minute since my last post so here’s an update:

Our internet was down for about 3 days and that slowed all my research to a grinding halt! So the backlog of work to do is high but I’m chipping away at it ! Yes long hours!

Next I have been actively writing biographies on Black Ambassadors for BlackPast.org the impressive online encyclopedia. I was very honored to be asked to do these 8 Ambassadors; Sue K. Brown, Montenegro, 2011-Present -Ann Forrester-Holloway, Mali, 1979-Gayleatha B. Brown, Benin, 2006-Sylvia Gaye Stanfield,Brunei Darussalam, 2002-Barbara M. Watson,Malaysia, 1981-Ruth Washington,Gambia, 1989-Leslie M. Alexander, Mauritius, 1993, Ecuador, 1996-Bernadette Allen, Niger, 2006!     So stay tuned and I’ll let you know when they get posted.

A couple of days ago Catherine (cousin) informed a few of us that she got word that there was a movement to have a landmark erected in remembrance of the homesteaders in the Dewitty community in Nebraska.  So Marcia and Catherine and myself started up a Facebook group which exists to highlight the lives of our ancestors – the DeWitty, Nebraska Homesteaders – who worked so hard to leave a rich legacy for us and future generations. We also plan to ensure that our voices are heard in the process of getting the landmark erected. We are not only hopeful but determined to see this happen.

Another great find is locating the platt maps of the land owners and by doing so I’ve been able to make the connection with my great great grandfather Joseph Birch and his father Daniel Birch on my maternal side.

So back to the grind… Oh and Sarah Brown  has a new blog up and running: BitterSweet Linked through slavery @ http://linkedthroughslavery.com/         Check it out!

More later…..cya

Researching Update

Ten thousand miles begins with one step

I saw that on a Facebook ad and thought how profound… Our ancestors took that first step to survive and make their lives count for something………..

Here’s a portion of what Monique posted on her blog:

“I have been researching my family for a while but just lately I connected with a cousin “Joyceann Gray”.  We didn’t know we were related, but during the course of our research we found several names that matched up through marriages.  One day I happened to mention that (Solomon H Thompson the grandson born in 1870: Grandma Frances brother) has some family papers at the University and I had a quote from the University but I hadn’t ordered it yet, so she responded send me the email, well I sent Joyceann the email and she responded once again and said I went on and ordered it I hope that was ok.  I was surprised and excited!!!   We were both excited because since we’ve been finding connections we both figured we might find some family information that would help.  I never expected to find what we found when the documents came back. I’ll let Joyceann tell you her side and what she found, but my ENTIRE family history from the Thompson side was written out on just a few pieces of paper.”

http://genealogybreakingdownthewalls.blogspot.com

My side of the story:  During our collaborating,  Monique and I  discovered we had Dr. Solomon Thompson in both our family trees. (I mentioned this in my Jan 5th post) From my research  I identified Dr. Thompson as a cousin to my maternal great-grandmother Charlotte Baldwin Hatter.  I was as excited as Monique to find out more about him and our family relationships. So when Monique said here’s the email, I jumped at it and sent the request and check into the Spencer Research Library and Impatiently waited for the response. When we finally got the emails with the attached copies of papers, it really was a great day. That email contained a gold mine for Monique. God is Good. Although I didn’t get the answers I was looking for Monique did and that makes it all worth while. 

Then just this past week, Monique finally got her DNA results and found that Skip Mason was a cousin, so back to the trees we went and again found that the three of us have the same ancestors.  Although I don’t share DNA with Monique or Skip they are still cousins since we do share four plus (4+) relationships through marriage. Their people and mine lived, worked and traveled in the same circles. They toiled the lands of the Samuel Walter and Bushrod Washington plantation’s back in the early 1800’s and made their marks after the war of the states.  All our ancestors contributed to their families, communities and to history!

They may have been born during slavery but that didn’t make them slaves.

 

The road to accomplishment

When the challenges are great, so are the possibilities for making real progress. Accept that those challenges exist, and yet do not be resigned to them.

Be clear and honest about where you are. Then begin moving boldly toward where you wish to go. Look realistically at the difficulties you face. In every single one of them, there is opportunity.

No one is better positioned than you to make the most of those unique and meaningful opportunities. For you know exactly where you are, where you intend to be, and what you have to work with. The road to real accomplishment leads directly through the challenges. Right now, you have what it takes to begin moving forward on that road.

You know what must be done, and more importantly, you know why you must do it. Step confidently into the challenges, and keep going until you reach the success that is on the other side. — Ralph Marsto

Happy Birthday Wishes!!

January

This is a busy month for birthday’s of those with us and those of us that we honor and remember!

Jan 1, 1914 – Neal (O’Neil) Page                            Jan 2,  1843 – Dolly Ann Irvin

                                                                                         1922 – Albert Riley Jr.

Jan 3, 1882 – Catherine L. Travis                           Jan 5 – Ibrahim Matin

Jan 6, 1876 – Sara Elizabeth                                   Jan 7 – Clymtene M. Brooks

Jan 8 – Monique                                                    Jan 9, 1853 – George W. Hatter

              1920 – Zelma F. Riley                                        1893 – Gordon W. Shreve

              1921 – Harold Wm. Stith                                    1885 – Samuel H. Travis  

 1875 – Theodora Epps

1917 – Kenneth M. Hayes

Jan 11, 1910 – Richard L. Reed, Jr.                     Jan 13 – Jehan Mesidor

            1934 – Leonard D. Shreve                                    1844 – Mary E. (Eliza) Brown

            1903 – Baldwin W. Walker                                   1858– Charlotte B. Hatter

            1866 – Jeanette Watts                                          1913 – Vera Mae Robbins

Jan 15, 1849 – Lewis Thompson Forte                 Jan 16, 1909 – William T. Carter

Jan 17, 1912 – Dwight E. Stith, Dr.                                 1883 – Tipton Tip Fugate

1828 – Elizabeth A. Tofflemire

Jan 18, 1872 – Felix Franklin Shreve           Jan 21, 1872 – Charles W. L. Travis

             1891 – Dennis E. Walker               Jan 22, 1877 – Jasper R. Thompson, Dr.

Jan 19, 1878 – Ina Lizella Thomas              Jan 24, 1948 – Dexter Rodney Hatter

Jan 20 – Marilyn Morton                                         1849 – Matilda Hatter

Thornton Hatter                                                                    Jan 25 – Teddy Hayes

               1867- Mary Jane Brooks                                     Marcia T. Thompkins

1878 – Grace Dureen Fox                           Jan 29 – Derrick Vaughn

1873 – Wm. Nelson Searight                                        1867 – Lessie Mary Cason

                                                                                    1884 – Mollie Thompson

                                                                                    1866 – Elizabeth E. Watts

**   Honor and remebered (With No exact day in January)

1820 – Ephriam Kersey                                                        1879 – Mable Nixon

1832 – Sarah Ann Travis                                                      1880 – Abraham Shreeves

1836 – Richard Page                                                             1883 – Noomie Tillery

1854 – Mary Isabella Kersey                                                 1888 – Austin C. Proctor

1855 – Louis McDade                                                          1889 – Blanch Tillery

1857 – Phoebe Arlena Brooks                                              1890 – Henrietta McDade

1879 – Mable Nixon                                                             1891 – Ethel Tillery

1882 – Della Jones                                                               1892 – Maybelle Carter

1881 – John T. Mc Campbell                                                           Britton Mc Dade

1882 – Britton McDade                                                        1896 – Annie R. Hatter

Charles B. Woodson, Sr.                                           Mosella Brooks

1862 – Jacob Mc Intosh                                                                 Herbert Staten

                                    1898 – Eva May Carter

                                     1899 – Harer Johnston

I Found Some New Leads

This past weekend I recieved two emails inquiring about the Gibson/Gipson side of the family! both are through marriage that we have a common bond.

It is so much fun  and very rewarding to connect with people and working the linage until you find the connections. Although sometimes it may just end up the relation is only  through marriage, still I consider the new additions as Cousins Discovered!!!  

 Take for instance My association with Monique Crippen-Hopkins, we started out as just members of the same Facebook online group Our Black Ancestry.  Through that group with the help of  my cousin Shelley Murphy’s introduction ,we found that the three of us were looking for family in the same small town of Charles Town West Virginia.  Charles Town, West VirgininaAs  a result  we not only found one connection but four (4) different connections through the years:

Henrietta Richardson (1897) who married George Hatter Cross (1880)

The son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter)(1850) who married in 1871 William Cross (1845)

Margaret C. Thompson (1894) who in 1931 married Eugene Godfrey Cross (1898)

Also the son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross.

Fannie C. Thompson (1892) who in 1933 married Chester Reed Cross (1892)

Also the son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross

Gelettia Sturgis Richardson married John Rufus Cross

Also son of Sarah (Fannie) Francis (Hatter) Cross.

William A. Thompson (1882) who married Rebecca Farrell (1880)

The daughter of Franklin & Rebecca Hatter; Emily (Hatter) (1848) married (1871) Lorenza Farrell (1836)

Emily is sister to Sarah).

  • Monique claims the Thompson’s, Farrell’s  and the Richardson’s 
  • I claim the Hatter’s and the Cross’s 

This was Great!!

Who are my cousins?

The following article was recently noted in Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. 

A term often found in genealogy is “removed,” specifically when referring to family relationships. Indeed, almost everyone has heard of a “second cousin once removed,” but many people cannot explain that relationship. Of course, a person might be more than once removed, as in third cousin, four times removed.

In short, the definition of cousins is two people who share a common ancestor. Here are a few definitions of cousin relationships:

First Cousin: Your first cousins are the people in your family who have at least one of the same grandparents as you. In other words, they are the children of your aunts and uncles.

Second Cousin: Your second cousins are the people in your family who share the same great-grandparent with you.

Third, Fourth, and Fifth Cousins: Your third cousins share at least one great-great-grandparent, fourth cousins share a great-great-great-grandparent, and so on.

Removed: When the word “removed” is used to describe a relationship, it indicates that the two people are from different generations. “Once removed” indicates a difference of one generation, “twice removed” indicates a difference of two generations, and so forth.

For example, the child of your first cousin is your first cousin, once removed. That is, your cousin’s child would be “almost” your first cousin, except that he or she is one generation removed from that relationship. Likewise, the grandchild of your first cousin is your first cousin, twice removed (two generations removed from being a first cousin).

Many people confuse the term “first cousin, once removed” with “second cousin.” The two are not the same.

Keep in mind that you and a relative only need to share one grandparent to be first cousins, or share one great-grandparent to be second cousins, etc. If the ancestor in question had more than one spouse and the two of you are descended from different spouses, you are full cousins. There is no such thing as a “half cousin” although you will hear people use that term occasionally.

The following consanguinity chart may help to explain the relationships:

Cousins Table: A cousin is someone who shares a common ancestor with you. Use this chart to determine your relationship.

Find your     ancestor here →


Find your cousin’s ancestor here ↓

Grand-

parents

G-

Grand-

parents

GG-

Grand-

parents

GGG-

Grand-

parents

GGGG-

Grand-

parents

Grand-

parents

1st cousins 1st cousins

1x removed

1st cousins

2x removed

1st cousins

3x removed

1st cousins

4x removed

G-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

1x removed

2nd cousins 2nd cousins

1x removed

2nd cousins

2x removed

2nd cousins

3x removed

GG-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

2x removed

2nd cousins

1x removed

3rd cousins 3rd cousins

1x removed

3rd cousins

2x removed

GGG-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

3x removed

2nd cousins

2x removed

3rd cousins

1x removed

4th cousins 4th cousins

1x removed

GGGG-

Grand-

parents

1st cousins

4x removed

2nd cousins

3x removed

3rd cousins

2x removed

4th cousins

1x removed

5th cousins

In the above chart, go across the top to find your ancestor: great-grandfather.
Next, go down the left column to find your cousin’s relationship to the same person: great-great-grandfather.

Now notice where the two intersect in the above chart: you and your new cousin are actually second cousins, once removed.

You may prefer to use an automated online tool to determine relationships. Ancestor Search has one that we found simple to use. Take a look athttp://www.searchforancestors.com/utility/cousincalculator.html

Here are a few other terms you may encounter when determining relationships:

HALF – Means you share only one parent. Example: half-brothers may have the same father but different mothers, etc.

STEP – Not blood kin, but a close legal relationship due to re-marriage of a parent, such as step-mother, step-brother, step-son, etc.

DOUBLE FIRST COUSINS – Are first cousins twice, once on your father’s side and once on your mother’s side, since your father’s sibling married your mother’s sibling.

IN-LAW – They are not really blood kin but are treated as such because they married blood kin.

Example: Your mother-in-law is not really your mother but is treated as such because you married her daughter/son. In law, you and your spouse are considered “one”. Also your brother-in-law is your brother because your parents are also his parents, in “law” (mother-in-law, father-in-law, etc.).

KITH and KIN – “Kith” are friends and acquaintances whereas “Kin” are blood relatives or someone treated as such, in law.

By the way, it is estimated that everyone has approximately 4 trillion 20th cousins! In other words, everyone is related to nearly everyone else.

By Julie Collins on Categories: Genealogy

Getting back on track

Now that the New Year is here and the holidays distractions are behind us,  it’s time to get back on tract!

During the course of my researching various family members  I have run across  the terms Mulatto, White and Black all in the same census of one family.  So I stopped and took a bit of a turn to research the words and why they might be used in this context.

  • The term “black” is often used in the West to describe people whose skin is darker. In the United States, it is particularly used to describe African-Americans. The terms for African-Americans have changed over the years, as shown by the categories in the United States Census, taken every ten years.
  • In the first U.S. Census, taken in 1790, just four categories were used: Free White males, Free White females, other free persons, and slaves.
  • In the 1820 census the new category “colored” was added.
  • In the 1850 census, slaves were listed by owner, and a B indicated black, while an M indicated “mulatto.”
  • In the 1890 census, the categories for race were white, black, mulatto, quadroon (a person one-quarter black); octoroon (a person one-eighth black), Chinese, Japanese, or American Indian.
  • In the 1930 census, anyone with any black blood was supposed to be listed as “Negro.”
  • In the 1970 census, the category “Negro or black” was used for the first time.
  • In the 2000 and 2012 census, the category “Black or African-American” was used, defined as “a person having their origin in any of the racial groups in Africa.” In the 2012 Census 12.1 percent of Americans identified themselves as Black or African-American.*

“Through the Decades”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-01-01

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