Kate’s Pottery

https://katebrownpottery.com/?fbclid=IwAR2lBHjawF6ApRmfuihFKXji9IzxIsOkEher36jVN98yPvZXktnY7uUhzuU

I am sharing Kate Brown’s collection that is for sale. It’s a fundraiser to put up a tribute plaque to those who were enslaved by her Washington family. Check out her website which is her name and she is from New Mexico. The pieces in this Cousins collection of Kate’s pottery will be on display in the case at the Charles Town West Virginia public library in the month of May 2019.

PLEASE SUPPORT THIS WORTHY CAUSE!

Charles Town Researchers

We’re getting together again!

“What We Found When We Came Together.”  

Come Join Us:

10 AM – 3 PM,

Saturday, April 13, 2019.

Location: Fishermen’s Hall

 Located at the northeast corner of South West and Academy Streets in Charles Town, WV

Sponsors:

Friends of Happy Retreat, Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society, Jefferson County Historical Society, and Jefferson County Museum

We are six women with roots in

Jefferson County, WV who embarked on separate journeys into the world of our ancestors, leading us to each other and bringing us a fresh understanding of the community in which they lived. By discovering the intertwining roots of our families, under walls of division and lost history, treasured new relationships have blossomed.

Please join us at Fishermans Hall on April 13th for a presentation of our individual and shared research. In each family story, there are brush strokes still needed to complete a full picture of our past. This will continue to enrich the vast scope of our shared history, difficult and inspiring, separate and together.

So bring your questions and bring a friend!

Panel discussion and audience Q&A

Our Panelists are:

Joyceann Gray

“Yes We Remember”- her family research in Honoring and keeping alive the memories of families that have paved the way for future generations. Also, how she connected with Monique and the Harewood plantation. Her books of family history.

Monique Crippen-Hopkins

Her research on her Charles Town ancestors, including the Thompson family, who were enslaved at Claymont. Her book on the Thompsons.

Sarah Brown

“Claymont’s Families: Research on the Enslaved Population of the Claymont (Court) Plantation.” Sarah is a descendant of Claymont’s slaveholders, the Bushrod Corbin Washington family.

Shelley Murphy

“Crossing the CountyLines.” A noted genealogist traces her family from Loudoun County VA to Jefferson County as freed people.

Dr. Marsha Smith

Marsha has been researching her family’s history for over 20 years. Her maternal line has extensive connections to Jefferson and Berkeley County, West Virginia dating back to when both were part of Virginia. In recent years, she has incorporated using autosomal DNA to extend her family tree and connect to new cousins.

Nikki Landerkin

Nikki is a life long resident of Martinsburg, WV. When she’s not researching, she busy teaching 7th and 8th grade English. Nikki has only been researching for a few years, but it has become a passion for her. Her goal is to become proficient at using DNA to pinpoint the location and names of her ancestors.

Fishermans Hall

April 13, 201910am-3pm

Charles Town, WV

Research ladies of Jefferson Co

Special thanks to Walter and Sarah!cropped-harewood-gathering-1-version-2.jpg

 

The first Gathering at Harewood Plantation just outside of Charles Town!

Hosted by S.Walter Washington and Sarah Brown, both direct descendants of the Washington families.Our first Harewood gathering brought together  the Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society (JCBHP), the descendants of those who built and serviced Harewood, and  Washington Descendants together with other interested Charles Town residents. We shared an insightful, soul soothing afternoon, and promised to return to further our research and connections. 

WELL, WE DID IT AGAIN!!

Research Ladies of Charles Town

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Our great gathering of new family – it’s a long story, but a great one!

L to R – Back row; Matt Landerkin; Kelly Ferrell (Joyceann’s daughter), Walter Washington, Sarah Brown.

Middle row; Leah Ferrell (Kelley’s daughter, Joyceann’s granddaughter), Monique Crippen-Hopkins, Marilyn M Morton (Joyceann’s sister).
Front row: Bunny Shaw (Nikki’s mom), Shelley Murphy, Nikki Matt Landerkin, Brennan Landerkin (Nikki and Matt’s son), Joyceann Gray, Jaden Landerkin (Nikki and Matt’s son). Yay! 

Walter, Gail, Sarah

Walter, Gail, Sarah

Other’s that left before the picture was taken; The Tolbert’s and the Taylors, Heidi Snow,  her sister and mother Mrs. Oliver.

How we began;

Shelley contacted Khadijah (my sister) with a question about the passenger list of the Carolinian that took manumitted enslaved persons to Liberia. Khadijah sent the information  to me (Joyceann) since I was doing the historical research for that branch of the family. Wow, what do you know  There in black and white was Rueben and Elizabeth Hatter, relations of ours connecting our family back to Harewood Plantation.Oh, and by the way, Shelley  is our cousin from the Nebraska branch of the family.

While all this is going on, Shelley connects me to Facebook group ‘Our Black Ancestry’ where I meet and share research with Monique   as we three are researching the same area Charles Town, WV. As we get deeper into our research low and behold Monique and I find out we’re cousins four times over. Some by blood some by marriage but cousins to be sure! Eventually, Sarah Brown connects with me since she has already made Monique’s connection to Claymont Plantation and they work to  solve the connection with Fortune Thompson and the Washington family.  Click here for her well-written accounting of her research.

Cousins

                                                                                   Cousins

Now to be sure this all didn’t happen overnight or in a week.

We have been working for years to gain a name or location. Shelley has been hard at for over 30 years! I can only imagine what her office/house looks like with all the records and documents she has amassed!  🙂

Next, our newest member of our team is Nikki ( a Goins relative), who lives in WV and has so much to offer, and share indeed she does.  You see, we just don’t look and study for our own historical benefit, we are constantly digging and uncovering for each other. Sarah found baptism records for my people, I found letters that helped Monique and so on. 

Now this past Saturday we met a few new people of Charles Town and shared a delightful potluck smorgasbord that satisfied everyone’s palette.

 

Our dining was watched over by Col Samuel Walter Washington upon the Wall…

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Wonder what he was thinking about our gathering…. 🙂

We spent all afternoon sharing our stories and research and filled the air with laughter and hugs.

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Shelley Murphy and Marilyn Morton

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Gail Parrish, Mrs. Taylor, and Willa Mae Oliver

 

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     Left to right: Jim Taylor, Jim Tolbert, Sarah Brown, Bunny Shaw and Nikki  Landerkin

 

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Even our little ones enjoyed the day with Walter Washington and Kelly Ferrell playing poker!

Walter, Brennan, Kelly, Leah

Walter, Brennan, Kelly, Jaden, and Leah

 

 

WATCH OUT THERE’S MORE TO COME………

 

Another Milestone

This time at the Jefferson County museum in Charles Town.

Website Narratives of Four Descendants of Jefferson County Enslaved and Free African-Americans On the iPad to the left, you can access genealogical research and family stories by several descendants of enslaved and free black Jefferson Countians.

Monique

Monique Crippen-Hopkins, a certified paralegal, blogger, family historian, and genealogist, is a descendant of the Thompson family of Jefferson County. Influenced as a young person by the importance her mother placed on genealogy and later in life by the loss of relatives who had been the repositories of family history, she began researching her family’s origins in 2006 and in 2013. Ms. Crippen-Hopkins’s blogging has led to exciting journeys and discoveries. She is writing a book on her family’s history.

Joyceann

Joyceann Gray, a U.S. Army retiree, author,family historian, and genealogist, is a descendant of the Hatter and McCord families of Jefferson County. Her historical and genealogical research is primarily focused on her family’s movements from Virginia to Liberia, Canada, Kentucky, and several other states. Mrs. Gray’s novel, Yes We Remember, is based on historical records and family stories of her ancestors. She is a contributor to the online encyclopedia Blackpast.org/contributor/gray-joyceann and has presented her research in several venues in the mid-Atlantic states.

Shelley

Dr. Shelley Murphy, a coordinator and faculty member for the Midwest African-American Genealogy Institute, is a descendant of the Goins family of Jefferson County. She has been an avid genealogist for 30+ years, researching the Marsh, Yates, Goins, Johnson, Sims, Myers, Roper, and other families in Jefferson and Loudoun counties. She attends and presents at local and national genealogical conferences and has 20+ publications with the Charlottesville Genealogy Examiner, familytreegirl.com blog, and the Central Virginia Heritage. Jim Taylor,

Dr. Shelley Murphy, a coordinator and faculty member for the Midwest African-American Genealogy Institute, is a descendant of the Goins family of Jefferson County. She has been an avid genealogist for 30+ years, researching the Marsh, Yates, Goins, Johnson, Sims, Myers, Roper, and other families in Jefferson and Loudoun counties. She attends and presents at local and national genealogical conferences and has 20+ publications with the Charlottesville Genealogy Examiner, familytreegirl.com blog, and the Central Virginia Heritage. Jim Taylor,

Jim Taylor

Jim Taylor, life-long county resident and former high school teacher and coach, is a descendant of the Payne and Dotson families of Jefferson County. He is one of four founders and currently an officer of the Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society (JCBHPS), has written a number of books on African-American history in Jefferson County, and is a member of the board of directors of the Jefferson County Historical Society. See the JCBHPS website at http://www.jcblackhistory.org.

 

A funny thing happened along this journey of mine

Is it fate or is it destiny or maybe a coincidence. Better yet, could it be our Ancestors have led us back to where our roots began to grow in this country?

Please read and make up your own mind!!

My research has taken me first to Liberia, Canada, then back to Charles Town West Virginia.   I have uncovered the following information that draws me back to St. Philips in Brooklyn NY:

  • Franklin D. Hatter enslaved by Andrew H. Hunter (prosecutor of the John Brown Trial) somehow convinced A. Hunter to sponsor his four (4) children in Mt. Zion Episcopal Church for baptism. This took place in 1855.
  • After the Civil War, the white congregation of Mt. Zion donated enough money to have the colored erect their own Church. St. Philips Episcopal Church, Charles Town WV (first Sunday school was taught by Bushrod Washington (nephew of George Washington)

Which is still an active church to this day.

  • Franklin Hatter’s father was James Hatter (his enslaver not known for sure) his brother Ruben Hatter was enslaved by Samuel Walter Washington (Brother of George Washington)
  • James Hatter’s Mother Charlotte, Aunt Sarah and grandfather Frances (b.1735) were enslaved by John Ariss the architect for “Harewood Plantation” in Charles Town, WV  he freed them in his will (1802) with the condition that they stay in serve to his wife until she dies… but not the children (two for sure; James and Ruben).
  • Harewood Plantation is the original home of Colonel Samuel Walter Washington erected in 1773.
  • His descendant S.Walter Washington added on modern living quarters and continues to live there presently.
  • The Hatter name first arrived in Loudoun County, VA in 1702. England King William in an effort to repay his friends (Huguenots) who had supported his war efforts paid for their passage to the Virginia colonies.

How ironic

  1.  I now live in the same county (Loudoun) as the first known ancestor arrived.
  2.  I now live 45 minutes from Charles Town where my ancestor lived and worked.
  3. They went to church at Mt Zion and St. Philips; Methodist-Episcopal churches.
  4.  So many years later I was raised in St. Philips (Episcopal) Church in Brooklyn, baptized and confirmed.

Revelations through Research Pg 2

Hatter, Maria (F, 23): Free Negro Register
African American Narrative Digital Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.
Source
Albemarle County (Va.) Free Negro and Slave Records, 1799-1870 ca.
Hatter, Tucker (M, 4): Free Negro Register
Maria’s boy

Index to “List of Free Negroes over the age of Twelve years in the Corporation of Staunton June 4 1851”
Cathran Anderson F -washwoman
Eveline Alestuck -house servant
Henry Bird M -carpenter
June Bird F
Rebeca Baldwin F — Washwoman
Patsy Brean -bound
Lusy Brean -house servant
Charles Brean -bound servant
David Brown- apprentice to shoemaker
Ben Brock M -labor
Clary Brock F
Robert Campbell M -barbor
Murial Campbell F
Mary Jane Campbell F
Charlot Campbell F
William Campbell M
Luis Campbell M
Thomas Campbell M -barber
Lora Campbell F
John H Fergenson -blacksmith
Hugh Gaunt -blacksmith
Jefferson Hall -labor
Thomas Kinney -plaseter
Charles Prean-carpenter
Aron Shovler -shoemaker
Frances Hatter — Washwoman
Nancy Henry -house servant
Jane Luis -washwoman
Lucinda Lukis-washwoman
Caroline Kinney (Alias Kenney) -washwoman
Margaret More -washwoman
Ann More -washwoman
Sally Morris -washwoman
Carline Moler -washwoman
Mary Tyry -house servant
William More
Sarah Yates -washwoman
Duffrey -boatman

Staunton (Va.) Free Negro and Slave Records, 1811-1861
1138036_0004_0002
Library of Virginia

Melungeon-Tuscarora

Revelations through Research

Hatter, Andrew: Petition For Re-Enslavement, Albemarle County
1863

Anderson Hatter sometimes called Andrew Hatter a free person of color,
supposed to be some thirty two or thirty three years of age, personally appeared
in court and made application to the court to select Benjamin F Abell
of the County of Albemarle, as his master, and to become a slave of the said Abell: and the court
having examined the said Hatter, and the said Abell separately, and such other
testimony as was introduced before it, in the presence of the attorney for the Commonwealth,
and being satisfied upon said examination, that no injustice was
done to the applicant, the said Hatter; that there has been no fraud or collusion
between the parties, and that there is no good reason to the contrary, and
that the said Benjamin F Abell is a person of good character, doth grant the
application of the said Hatter, and doth hereby order and direct that the property in
the said Anderson or Andrew Hatter shall, from this day, vest in the said
Benjamin F. Abell, and that the rights and liabilities and condition of the said
Hatter shall henceforth in all respects be the same as though said Hatter had
been a slave.

Know all men to these presents that we Benjamin F. Abell and
John Burch are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth
of Virginia in the just and full sum of Two Thousand Dollars
to the payment whereof well and truly to be made we bind ourselves jointly
and severally, our joint and several heirs, executors and administrators
firmly by these presents. Sealed with our seals and dated this twelfth
day of May in the year, 1863.
The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas Anderson
Hatter alias Andrew Hatter a free man of color has this
day made application to the Circuit Court of Albemarle county to select a
master and become a slave: And whereas the said Anderson alias Andrew
Hatter has chosen the said Benjamin F. Abell as his master, and the said
Court has satisfied and approved said selection: Now therefore if the said Anderson
alias Andrew Hatter shall not hereafter become chargeable to any
county or corporation in this Commonwealth, and the said Benjamin F. Abell
shall pay the debts and liabilities of said Anderson alias Andrew Hatter
existing prior to this date, then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to
remain in full force and virtue.
Benja [Benjamin] F Abell (Seal)
John Burch (Seal)
Witness Ira Garrett

Reference: Hatter, Andrew: Petition For Re-Enslavement, Albemarle County
1863 American Narrative Digital Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

April 13th, in Charles Town WV, the Charles Town Researchers meet up again!

We are six women with roots in Jefferson County, WV who embarked on separate journeys into the world of our ancestors, leading us to each other and bringing us a fresh understanding of the community in which they lived.

This time we sought to share our research and findings with a great turn out of interested folks.

Shelley said:

Let me introduce you to the Jefferson County, VA/WV fabulous genealogy researchers, (L-R) Kate Brown, me, Monique Crippen-HopkinsJoyceann GraySarah Brown and Marsha Smith. We were in Charles Town, Jefferson County, WV, on the 13th sharing our stories of what happens when we come together with our research. All of our lines connect. We are descendants of the Enslaver, and Free/Enslaved African Americans. Thanks for hosting us at Fisherman’s Hall. Folks get a genealogy group together and see what happens.

Sarah said:

A fabulous day with a terrific group! On April 13th, in Charles Town WV (site of my ancestors’ plantation) we gathered to present our work on uncovering shared roots within our separate family histories. L to R: my sis Kate Brown;Shelley MurphyMonique Crippen-Hopkins;Joyceann Gray; me; Marsha Smith. These wonderful, dedicated women have kept me afloat during my research, offering insight and support I would have been lost without. 
It’s a long story – too long to tell here – but a good one. You can read more about it on my Sarah Brown’s Blue Bridges page.

Laurie Potteiger

April 13 at 8:15 PM · 

Fantastic, compelling, informative and inspiring workshop. Thank you so much for all your work, and for sharing it with us!

Claudia Elferdink Truly amazing! Good to see you there Kate!

Sarah Brown it was a truly great experience! Thank you so much to my dear ‘cousins’. Every presentation was interesting and well delivered, each connected to the others in intriguing ways. Only one thing missing – our dear cousin Nikki! Get well soon!

Monique Crippen-Hopkins I had a great time!! Thanks to everyone involved and for letting me be part of this fabulous group.

More to come……..

More on the History of the Melungeons

History of the Melungeons

Abe Lincoln, Elvis Presley?

Melungeons

LATER 17TH CENTURY FAMILIES ASSOCIATED WITH FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS

1670’s: Anderson, Atkins, Barton, Boarman, Bowser, Brown, Bunch, Buss, Butcher, Butler, Carney, Case, Church, Combess, Combs, Consellor, Day, Farrell/Ferrell, Fountain, Game, Gibson/Gipson, Gregory, Grimes, Grinnage, Hobson, Howell, Jeffries, Lee, Manuel, Morris, Mullakin, Nelson, Osborne, Pendarvis, Quander, Redman, Reed, Rhoads, Rustin, Skipper, Sparrow, Stephens, Stinger, Swann, Waters, Wilson.

1680’s: Artis, Booth, Britt, Brooks, Bryant, Burkett, Cambridge, Cassidy, Collins, Copes, Cox, Dogan, Donathan, Forten/Fortune, Gwinn, Hilliard, Hubbard, Impey, Ivey, Jackson, MacDonald, MacGee, Mahoney, Mallory, Okey, Oliver, Penny, Plowman, Press/Priss, Price, Proctor, Robins, Salmons/Sammons, Shoecraft, Walden, Walker, Wiggins, Wilkens, Williams

1690’s: Annis, Banneker, Bazmore, Beddo, Bond, Cannedy/Kennedy, Chambers, Conner, Cuffee, Dawson, Durham, Ford, Gannon, Gates, Graham, Hall, Harrison, Hawkins, Heath, Holt, Horner, Knight, Lansford, Lewis, Malavery, Nichols, Norman, Oxendine, Plummer, Pratt, Prichard, Rawlinson, Ray, Ridley, Roberts, Russell, Sample, Savoy, Shaw, Smith, Stewart, Taylor, Thompson, Toney, Turner, Weaver, Welsh, Whistler, Willis, Young

These African-American families appeared in the southern tidewater colonies when evidence indicates that most all of the blacks coming to America, were Angolan by birth.

THE EARLIEST MELUNGEON CLANS IN SOUTHERN TIDEWATER COLONIES

The following are some of the first black, white, Indian and mixed families who began intermarrying in the 1600s in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and the Carolinas to produce the people who became known as “Melungeons”.

The African who became known as John Gowen of Virginia, was born about 1615. Before 1775, his descendants had married into the black, white, Indian and mixed families of Ailstock, Bass, Chavis, Corn, Cumbo, Dungill, Findley, Hill, Jones,Locklear, Lucas, Matthews, Mason, Miner, Mills, Patterson, Pompey, Stewart, Simmons, Singleton, Tyre, Webb, and Wilson; many of whom can also be traced to the 17th century.

Thomas Chivers/Chavis was born in 1630. Before 1775, his descendants had married into the mixed families of Bass, Locklear, Singleton, Stewart, Cumbo, Matthews, and Wilson as had descendants of John Gowen. In addition the Chivers/Chavis group intermarried with Bird, Blair, Blythe, Brandon, Bunch, Cannady, Carter, Cypress, Drew, Earl, Evans, Francis, Gibson, Gillet,Haithcock, Harris, Hawley, Hull, Kersey, Lowry, Manly, Manning, Mitchell, McLin, Scott, Silvey, Smith, Snelling, Silver, Sweat, Thaxton, Tyner, Thomerson, Taborn, Valentine, Watts, and Walden; many of whom were 17th century Africans in the British-American colonies.

The family of Eleanor Evans, born in 1660, shares with the Gowen and Chavis families the following names: Bird, Brandon, Chavis, Dunghill, Harris, Kersey, McLinn, Mitchell, Snelling, Scott, Stewart, Sweat, Taborn, and Walden. In addition, the Evans were early related to the families of Anderson, Boyd, Bee, Blundon, Doyal, Green, Hudnall, Hunt, Jeffries, Jones, Lantern, Ledbetter, Penn,Pettiford, Redcross, Richardson, Rowe, Sorrell, Spriddle,Tate, Thomas, Toney, and Young.

The Gibson/Gipson family which descended from Elizabeth Chavis, born in 1672, also shares with the 17th century Gowen, Chavis, and Evans families, the surnames of Bass, Bunch, Chavis, Cumbo, and Sweat. They add Driggers, Deas, Collins, and Ridley.

The family of the Angolan named Emmanuel Driggers, [Rodriggus] born in 1620, also has several families in common with the Gowen, Chavis, Evans and Gibson clans: namely Carter, Collins, Sweat, Gibson, and Mitchell. In addition, the Driggers intermarried with Beckett, Beavens, Bingham, Bruinton, Copes, Fernando, Francisco, George, Gussal, Harman, Hodgkins, Jeffrey, Johnson, King, Kelly Lindsey, Landrum, Liverpool, Moore, Payne, Reed, and Sample.

From Margarett Cornish, born about 1610, comes the Cornish family with ties to Gowen and Sweat in addition to Shaw and Thorn.

With the Cumbo family dating back to 1644, we have links to Gibson, Gowen, Jeffries, Matthews, Newsom, Wilson and Young in addition to Hammond, Maskill, Potter, and Skipper.

The Bass family originates in 1638 America and shares several connections from an early period with Gowen, Chavis, Evans, Cornish, Driggers, Cumbos and Gibsons which are: Anderson, Byrd, Bunch, Cannady, Chavis, Day, Mitchell, Gowen, Pettiford, Richardson, Snelling, Valentine and Walden. In addition, they are related to the mixed families of Farmer, Hall, Lovina, Nickens, Perkins, Pone, Price, Roe, and Roberts.

If given the space, we could present complex scores of intermarriages of Melungeon and other mixed surnames beginning in the 1600s of colonial America. These common kinships of cousins show the Melungeon society was becoming cohesive and distinctively apart in colonial America at least 100 years before the American Revolution. The Melungeon community began before 1700.

For example: The Banks family originates in 1665 colonial America with related families of Adam, Brown, Day, Howell, Isaacs, Johnson, Lynch, Martin, Walden, Wilson, and Valentine along with several Melungeon surnames.

The Archer family begins in 1647 America with related families; Archie, Bass, Bunch, Heathcock, Manly, Murray, Milton, Newsom, Roberts, and Weaver.

The Bunch clan traces back to 1675 colonial America with kinship to: Bass, Chavis,Chavers, Collins, Gibson, Griffin, Hammons, Pritchard, and Summerlin.

The Beckett family of 1655 ties to Bibbins, Beavens, Collins, Driggers, Drighouse, Liverpool, Mongon, Morris, Moses, Nutt, Stevens, and Thompson.

The family of Carter begins in 1620 America with the related families of: Best, Blizzard, Braveboy, Bush, Cane, Copes, Dove, Driggus, Fernando, Fenner, Godett, George, Harmon, Howard, Jacobs, Jones, Kelly, Lowery, Moore, Norwood, Nicken, Perkins, Rawlinson, and Spellman.

Mixed red, white, and black Melungeons can be found in Virginia and Maryland within one and two generations of the first Mbundu-Angolan appearance in Jamestown in 1619. The general Melungeon community is more than 350 years old in North America.

All of these families descended from, or intermarried with, 17th century Angolans of Virginia. They began building the Melungeon community more than a century before they appeared in Tennessee.

DeWitty on the Road

Delbert DeWitty, a descendant of Miles DeWitty, (the firest Postmaster of the longest lasting African American settlement in the State of Nebraska) gave an excellent presentation in Lincoln, Nebraska. Check it out!

https://www.facebook.com/ddewitty/videos/10212997888725538/

 

DeWitty Tree.png

 

We did it again June 23, 2018

What a wonderful Summer day, a little rain, a bit of sun, lots of laughter and hugs and a fabulous array of food to share. We had a great afternoon!

So far we’ve only missed one year but promise to try to not let that happen again.

Warmest of thanks to Walter for opening his home and the Samuel Walter Washington House to us once again! Our Sarah, dear Sarah Brown (bass player, songwriter and Washington descendant) has traveled so far to be with us with her husband published author John Hubner coming in town just in time to be wowed by our teenagers’ brilliance.  We look toward the future without kids providing Olympic passes and a number of college graduation celebrations.    The rest of us nibbled on the delightful spread and compared notes of how our independent research was coming along. We chatted about a  possible Marker in remembrance of the enslaved that lived and worked at Harewood. Marsha and Nikki got into a deep DNA discussion and Sarah and I laugh because that wave went way over our heads. Sarah announces she was close to finishing her database of folks who were enslaved by the Washington families and which plantation that they worked.

 

 

Missing from the photo but not from our hearts is Shelley Murphy, Lei Bennifield, Monique Crippen-Hopkins.

We call ourselves the Charles Town Researchers.

2018 Reunion

 

Award winning “Our DeWitty and Now We Speak”

for a Soft Copy Click here

For Hard Copy Click hereOur DeWitty Cover

I’m thrilled to share the news:
My book has been named a WINNER in the 2018 International AAHGS Book Awards Contest (IABA).

Our Dewitty is my second book referencing family, friends, and neighbors who collectively established the longest lasting Black Settlement in all of Nebraska.

In this book, I’ve focused on the Women and what they had to say since largely their voice has not been heard in most all accountings of the Homesteaders.

I do hope you enjoy reading about these strong women who were actually the backbone of the town and the families. Learn about their struggles, dreams, successes, and legacies.

Thank you,

JaGray

 

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